Regulatory Law

Regulatory Law is a complex area of practice and one that needs specialist advice.

We have appeared before criminal courts and other regulatory tribunals around the country.

What Work is Involved?

We assist organisations and directors in dealing with enquiries, prosecutions and litigation arising from investigations by: – Technical Regulators such as Health and Safety Executive, Environment Agency and Trading Standards; Financial regulation, business crime and tax fraud which involves liaison with the Police, HM Customs & Excise and the Inland Revenue. This is a fluid area of law and we offer advice to organisations on how best to comply with the regulations imposed upon them by these bodies. Relevant regulations include food and product safety; health and safety; environmental law; consumer protection and competition law. We also have a strong Commercial Department who can provide assistance to business clients so that we are able to offer a seamless service.

Our Values

Whether the problems are big or small and whether it is a large corporation or a single member company, we offer a professional, friendly and value for money service, making sure we understand the needs and concerns of our clients and we are committed to achieving the best result possible.

Why not read one of our Success Stories and then give one of our specialist solicitors a call today.

Success Stories

Sandwich bar owners avoid hefty fine over mouldy pasta.

Mr and Mrs K came to Ellis-Fermor & Negus when a customer complained that a pasta salad she had bought from their sandwich bar in the city centre was mouldy. The aggrieved customer had taken her pasta to the city council’s environmental health department who suggested the mould had developed over a period of 36 hours.

Our solicitor defended Mr and Mrs K saying that no-one else had complained about the food on that day and that the sandwich bar had been trading for ten years and had not had any previous complaints about the quality of its food. Nor had the complaining customer been injured by the incident as she hadn’t actually eaten the food.

Result: The magistrates accepted that the case represented an isolated incident and ordered Mr and Mrs K to pay just £630 prosecution costs.